Can Brainwave Analysis demonstrate Agnihotra’s Impact on Mental Tranquility?

The Vedas say that when you perform evening Agnihotra, it gives you mental tranquility until morning, and when you perform morning Agnihotra the tranquility lasts to the evening. Hence the cycle of mental tranquility is replenished with each Agnihotra.


If this is the case, how do brainwave scans appear during some of the most stressful times during the day, e.g., during work?


I have engaged in a consistent Agnihotra practice for nearly 13 years. I monitored myself during my workday using the EEG headband, and below are screenshots of absolute brain waves during work.


The first set of screenshots was from a conference call I attended in which I was passively listening (i.e., not mentally engaged). The second set of screenshots was from when I was conducting market research and was engaged in reading.

Working: Passively Listening to a Conference Call






Working: Conducting Market Research and Engaged in Reading





Observations

Some notable observations:


  1. During both times of work, delta waves were the predominant brainwave. This means I was in a mental state of tranquility and my body was in a state of rest and recovery, including when my mind was engaged while reading and conducting research.


  1. During both times of work, delta and theta waves followed similar time signatures of peaks and valleys, and maintained a roughly proportional relationship.


  1. During both times of work, alpha and beta waves likewise followed similar time signatures of peaks and valleys, and maintained a roughly proportional relationship.


  1. During both times of work, beta and gamma waves were the lowest two bands, indicating my mind was relaxed, even while engaged in reading and concentration.


  1. During the passive work call, delta, theta, and alpha waves were the three predominant brainwaves at 37.8%, 17.8%, and 24.5%, respectively, of the total brainwave bands. During the engaged research, delta, theta, and alpha waves were also the three predominant brainwaves at 34.2%, 19.9%, and 26%, respectively. This means switching from a relaxed state of passive listening to an active state of research and reading required only a small reduction in delta waves, and a small increase in both theta and alpha brainwaves.



Does the predominance of delta waves, including during work, indicate a constant state of mental tranquility?


Do the similar patterns of delta and theta waves, and alpha and beta waves indicate a mental coherence present while the mind is engaged in work?


Does the predominance of delta waves and small proportion of beta waves indicate a mind that can engage and concentrate with small mental exertion?


How much of this is attributable to Agnihotra as opposed to meditation (both of which are regular practices)?


These studies would be interesting to repeat for different groups of long-time Agnihotra practitioners, new Agnihotra practitioners, long-time meditators, new meditators, and people who do not engage in regular practice.



62 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All